Kentucky Office of Highway Safety

 

 

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MISSION:

"To support effective and collaborative partnerships to advance traffic safety awareness, education, and enforcement in an effort to save lives on Kentucky roadways."


 The Kentucky Office of Highway Safety works specifically to save lives by reducing Kentucky’s highway crashes, injuries, and fatalities through relevant data-driven, outcomes-based approaches and effective program delivery.

 

 KENTUCKY HIGHWAY SAFETY NEWS

 


 

2019 Lifesavers Conference | Kentucky International Convention Center

 
REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN

Registration is open for the Lifesavers National Conference on Highway Safety Priorities!

  • Over 80 workshops in 10 educational tracks - CEUs will be offered on select Occupant Protection for Children workshops
  • Over 100 exhibits
  • Posters presenting new highway safety research & initiatives
  • Opening plenary on Sunday with prominent highway safety professionals
  • Lunch on Sunday
  • Networking hour Sunday afternoon to meet exhibitors
  • Continental breakfast on Monday
  • Public Service Awards Luncheon on Monday
  • Churchill Downs event Monday evening featuring buffet dinner and museum & paddock area tour
  • Closing plenary lunch on Tuesday
  • Refreshment breaks
  • All conference materials

REGISTRATION RATES 

$350 – Early Bird (until January 25) 

$400 – Regular (January 26 – March 1) 

$500 – Late (March 2 – April 2) 

$100 – Students* (full-time high school/college) 

$100 – Needs-Based*

*Students and Needs-Based: Visit the Lifesavers Registration page for criteria and application.

Lifesavers Conference Attendee Registration

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Churchill Downs Event

Lifesavers is hosting a special event at Churchill Downs on Monday, April 1 from 5-8:00 p.m. featuring a buffet dinner and museum & paddock area tour. Admission is included with your paid registration. Advance notice of your attendance is required; no tickets will be issued on-site. If you would like to bring a guest, the fee is $85. Bus transportation will be provided to and from Churchill Downs.


 QUESTIONS? Call 703-922-7944

Visit the Lifesavers website for more conference information and updates

www.lifesaversconference.org

Lifesavers Conference, Inc. | P.O. Box 30045, Alexandria VA 22310
 

 NATIONAL HIGHWAY SAFETY NEWS


 

This Holiday Season, and All Year Long:

Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over


 

The holidays are a time for friends, family, and co-workers to come together in celebration. Wherever you are—whether at an office party, a family member's home, or out at the bar—it is essential that you make the lifesaving choice to drive sober when the party ends. To help spread the message about the dangers of drunk driving, nationwide law enforcement agencies are partnering with the U.S. Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to get drunk drivers off the roads and help save lives. The national high-visibility enforcement campaign, Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over, runs from December 13-31, 2018. During this period, local law enforcement will show zero tolerance for drunk driving, as well as drugged driving, which is on the rise. Increased State and national messages about the dangers of driving impaired, coupled with enforcement and increased officers on the road, aim to drastically reduce drunk driving on our nation's roadways. 

According to NHTSA, 10,874 people were killed in drunk-driving crashes in 2017, equating to one person killed every 48 minutes. On average, 10,000 people were killed in drunk-driving crashes each year from 2013 to 2017. That’s the equivalent of 20 jumbo jets crashing each year, with no survivors. In December 2017, alone, 885 people lost their lives in traffic crashes involving a drunk driver.

First and foremost: Plan ahead. Be honest with yourself: You know whether you'll attend a party. If you plan to drink, plan for a sober driver to take you home. Is it your turn to be the designated driver? Take that role seriously—your friends are relying on you. Remember that it is never okay to drink and drive. Even if you've had only one alcoholic beverage, designate a sober driver or plan to use public transportation or a ride service to get home safely.

  • Remember that it is never okay to drink and drive. Even if you've had only one alcoholic beverage, designate a sober driver or plan to use public transportation or a ride service to get home safely.
  • Download NHTSA's SaferRide mobile app, available on Google Play for Android devices: (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.nhtsa.SaferRide&hl=en), and Apple's iTunes Store for iOS devices: (https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/saferride/id950774008?mt=8). SaferRide allows users to call a taxi or a predetermined friend, and identifies the user's location so he or she can be picked up.
  • Use your community's sober ride program.
  • If you see a drunk driver on the road, contact your local law enforcment agency.
  • Have a friend who is about to drink and drive? Take the keys away and make arrangements to get your friend home safely.

During the holidays, and every day, please remember that drunk driving isn't only illegal, it's deadly.

Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over


 

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NHTSA Urges Motorists to Drive Safely Near School Zones and Bus Stops

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is urging motorists to exercise caution and follow State laws when approaching a school bus or school crossing.  Following a string of recent tragedies in Florida, Indiana, Mississippi, Pennsylvania, and Kentucky,

NHTSA is calling on the public and media to help educate communities on ways to reduce incidents of stop-arm violations and ensure all students arrive to and from school safely. 

Tips for Motorists:

  • Be alert and slow down when driving in neighborhoods with school zones.
  • Watch for children walking, playing or assembling near bus stops. Children arriving late for the bus may dart into the street without looking for traffic.
  • Obey the school bus laws in your State, as well as the flashing light signal systems used on school buses.    
    • Flashing yellow lights indicate the bus is preparing to stop to load or unload children. Motorists should slow down and prepare to stop their vehicles.
    •  Flashing red lights and extended stop arms indicate the bus has stopped and children are getting on or off. Motorists must stop their cars and wait until the red lights stop flashing, the extended stop arm is withdrawn, and the bus begins moving before they can start driving again.

Tips for Caregivers and Students:

  • Arrive at the bus stop at least 5 minutes before the bus is scheduled to arrive. Stand at least three giant steps (6 feet) away from the curb. The bus stop is not a place to run or play.
  • When the school bus arrives, wait until the bus comes to a complete stop, the door opens, and the driver says it’s okay before approaching the bus door. Use the handrails to avoid falling.
  • Never walk behind a school bus. Walk on a sidewalk or along the side of the street. Cross the street in front of the bus with at least five giant steps (10 feet) between the front of the bus and you.  Make eye contact with the bus driver before crossing to make sure the driver can see you. 
  • If you drop something near the school bus, like a ball or book, tell the bus driver right away. Do not try to pick up the item, because the driver might not be able to see you.

Visit NHTSA.gov/school-bus-safety or follow NHTSA on Twitter (@NTSAgov), Facebook (/NHTSA), and Instagram (@nhtsagov) for more information on this important safety topic. 


 

  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
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Highway Safety Online Mobilization Tracking System

CURRENT KENTUCKY ROADWAY FATALITIES FOR 2018

674

Click link below for further Daily Fatality Report Information

Daily Fatality Report - 12-17-2018.pdf


 

TOTAL YEAR TO DATE 2017

757

 

TOTAL KENTUCKY ROADWAY FATALITIES FOR 2017

782

Click link below for the Year End 2017 Daily Fatality Summary Information

Daily Fatality Summary YE 2017_as_of_02-14-2018.pdf


 

Stop. Trains Can't.

The Right Choice at Railroad Crossings Could Save Your Life

Don't Risk It at Railroad Crossings

  • Approximately every three hours, a person or vehicle is hit by a train in the United States.
  • Most of these deaths were caused by risky driving behaviors and poor decision- making, and could have been prevented.
  • Remember: Stop. Trains Can't. Avoiding a collision with a train is the responsibility of the motorist.

Trains Always Have the Right of Way

  • By law, trains have the right of way at all railroad crossings.

  • Trains cannot swerve, stop quickly, or change direction to avert collisions. A train traveling at 55 miles per hour takes a mile or more to stop.

  • State highway traffic safety laws require all motorists to slow, yield, or stop until the train has cleared the roadway and it is safe to cross.

  • It is illegal to go around a lowered crossing gate or to ignore signs or flashing lights posted at a railroad crossing.

Understand the Signage and Follow the Law

  • Of the 130,000 public railroad crossings in the United States, roughly 54 percent are "active" crossings that include warning devices such as gates, bells, or flashing lights to alert motorists of an approaching train. But 46 percent are "passive" crossings, where only signs and markings are present.

  • While warning devices do improve safety at railroad crossings, they do not prevent 100 percent of collisions. Approximately 60 percent of all collisions at railroad crossings occur where active warning devices are present, and nearly 19 percent of all crossing collisions involve a motor vehicle striking the side of a train already in the crossing.

  • Motorists must come to a complete stop at least 15 feet from the track if: 1) flashing red lights are activated, 2) a crossing gate is lowered, 3) a flagman signals you to stop, 4) a stop sign is posted, or 5) a train is clearly visible or you hear the whistle of a train.

  • Ignoring signage or attempting to go around a crossing gate that is down can have deadly consequences. It is never worth risking your life by ignoring the law or racing a train.

  • The best way to avoid a collision with a train is to understand and follow the warning signage, and to always stop for a train.

Use Caution at Every Railroad Crossing

  • When approaching a railroad crossing, slow down, and look and listen for a train on the tracks, especially at "passive" crossings.

  • Look carefully in both directions before crossing a railroad track—even during the day. Sixty-seven percent of railroad crossing collisions occur in clear weather conditions.

  • Do not rely on past experience to guess when a train is coming. Trains can come from either direction at any time.

  • Never race a train. It is easy to misjudge a train's speed and distance from the crossing. A train traveling at 55 miles per hour takes a mile to stop—the length of 18 football fields or more—after applying the emergency brakes.

  • Before entering a railroad crossing, check that there is enough room on the other side of the tracks for your vehicle to cross completely and safely. Be aware that you may need to cross multiple sets of tracks at some railroad crossings.

  • Never stop on the railroad tracks. Keep moving once you have entered the crossing, and to avoid stalling, never shift gears on the tracks.

  • If your vehicle does stall on a railroad track, quickly move away from the track and your vehicle at a 45-degree angle. Call the number on the Emergency Notification System (ENS) sign, or if the ENS sign is not visible to you, dial 911 for help.

Remember: The Right Choice at Railroad Crossings Could Save Your Life.

Stop. Trains Can't.

This information has been provided by NHTSA.

 

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​This page is maintained by Brad.Franklin@ky.gov, who may be contacted to make corrections or changes.

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