Coronavirus Alert - For the latest information on the Coronavirus in Kentucky, please visit kycovid19.ky.gov

For the latest updates on driving and motor vehicle services, please visit drive.ky.gov

For the latest updates on KYTC office and facility closures and reopenings, Click Here

School Curriculum and Teacher Resources

​​​

  
  
EPA is building a voluntary, national catalog of organizations involved in protecting local water bodies, including formal watershed alliances, local groups, and schools that conduct activities such as volunteer monitoring, cleanups, and restoration projects.  You can search the EPA database by state and then by city to find local groups.
  
Partnering with Schools. Many Adopt-A-Stream programs partner with schools to develop interdisciplinary classroom curricula and activities. Through the program, teachers and students adopt a waterway, perform chemical, physical, and biological testing to determine water quality, and perform habitat restoration. Participating in such an interdisciplinary program gives classroom learning a real-life application, enhances students’ problem-solving capabilities, and provides community recognition of the students’ efforts. Teachers can select projects and activities that best match their students’ capabilities and the materials and resources available. The national Adopt-A-Stream organization , as well as numerous agencies nationwide, can provide teacher’s guides for developing a classroom Adopt-A-Stream program.  Some schools find it valuable to enlist a co-sponsor, such as a community group or private organization, to aid them in their efforts. Co-sponsors vary in their involvement with the students. Some activities that co-sponsors can undertake include meeting with students to demonstrate community support for their efforts, helping to select an appropriate waterway, providing special information about the waterway, accompanying students on field trips, helping to prepare news releases and articles about the program, providing funds (if necessary), and helping to prepare a written report that compiles all of the data from schools in the watershed. Students and community members can then use this report as a focal point around which to plan strategies for involvement and actions for the coming year.
  
  
  
National Environmental Education Week, made possible by Canon, promotes environmental literacy and stewardship among over 3.5 million students annually by creating a full week of environmentally-themed lessons and activities for students in K-12th grade classrooms, home schools, nature centers, zoos, museums and aquariums.  Each year, thousands of educators from across the country use EE Week’s online resources to incorporate environmental learning into their classrooms in an educational week-long prelude to Earth Day. Registration for EE Week is free.
  
World Water Monitoring Day (WWMD) is an international outreach program that builds public awareness and involvement in protecting water resources around the world. Held annually between September 18 and October 18, the program engages communities in monitoring the condition of local rivers, streams, estuaries and other water bodies. Since its inception in 2002, more than 80,000 people have participated in 50 countries.
  
NAAEE is the national professional association for environmental education. NAAEE members promote professional excellence in nonformal organizations, K-12 classrooms, universities (both instructors and students), government agencies, and corporate settings throughout North America and in over 55 other countries. Since 1971, the Association has created opportunities for its members to improve their skills in creating and delivering programs and services that teach people how to think, not what to think.
  
  
Partnering with Schools. Many Adopt-A-Stream programs partner with schools to develop interdisciplinary classroom curricula and activities. Through the program, teachers and students adopt a waterway, perform chemical, physical, and biological testing to determine water quality, and perform habitat restoration. Participating in such an interdisciplinary program gives classroom learning a real-life application, enhances students’ problem-solving capabilities, and provides community recognition of the students’ efforts. Teachers can select projects and activities that best match their students’ capabilities and the materials and resources available. The national Adopt-A-Stream organization , as well as numerous agencies nationwide, can provide teacher’s guides for developing a classroom Adopt-A-Stream program.  Some schools find it valuable to enlist a co-sponsor, such as a community group or private organization, to aid them in their efforts. Co-sponsors vary in their involvement with the students. Some activities that co-sponsors can undertake include meeting with students to demonstrate community support for their efforts, helping to select an appropriate waterway, providing special information about the waterway, accompanying students on field trips, helping to prepare news releases and articles about the program, providing funds (if necessary), and helping to prepare a written report that compiles all of the data from schools in the watershed. Students and community members can then use this report as a focal point around which to plan strategies for involvement and actions for the coming year.
  
  
EPA is building a voluntary, national catalog of organizations involved in protecting local water bodies, including formal watershed alliances, local groups, and schools that conduct activities such as volunteer monitoring, cleanups, and restoration projects.  You can search the EPA database by state and then by city to find local groups.
  
  
World Water Monitoring Day (WWMD) is an international outreach program that builds public awareness and involvement in protecting water resources around the world. Held annually between September 18 and October 18, the program engages communities in monitoring the condition of local rivers, streams, estuaries and other water bodies. Since its inception in 2002, more than 80,000 people have participated in 50 countries
  
  
General
  
Partnering with Schools. Many Adopt-A-Stream programs partner with schools to develop interdisciplinary classroom curricula and activities. Through the program, teachers and students adopt a waterway, perform chemical, physical, and biological testing to determine water quality, and perform habitat restoration. Participating in such an interdisciplinary program gives classroom learning a real-life application, enhances students’ problem-solving capabilities, and provides community recognition of the students’ efforts. Teachers can select projects and activities that best match their students’ capabilities and the materials and resources available. The national Adopt-A-Stream organization , as well as numerous agencies nationwide, can provide teacher’s guides for developing a classroom Adopt-A-Stream program.  Some schools find it valuable to enlist a co-sponsor, such as a community group or private organization, to aid them in their efforts. Co-sponsors vary in their involvement with the students. Some activities that co-sponsors can undertake include meeting with students to demonstrate community support for their efforts, helping to select an appropriate waterway, providing special information about the waterway, accompanying students on field trips, helping to prepare news releases and articles about the program, providing funds (if necessary), and helping to prepare a written report that compiles all of the data from schools in the watershed. Students and community members can then use this report as a focal point around which to plan strategies for involvement and actions for the coming year.
General
  
EPA is building a voluntary, national catalog of organizations involved in protecting local water bodies, including formal watershed alliances, local groups, and schools that conduct activities such as volunteer monitoring, cleanups, and restoration projects.  You can search the EPA database by state and then by city to find local groups.
General
  
Through rigorous research, education and public outreach, the Stroud Water Research Center, seeks to advance our global knowledge and stewardship of fresh water ecosystems. Driven by the philosophy that understanding the science of fresh water is fundamental to our ability to protect the integrity of this finite and vital resource, Stroud seeks to disseminate its research findings to its peers in the scientific and educational communities, as well as businesses, landowners, policy makers and individuals, to enable informed decision making that effects water quality and availability in our local communities and the world around us.  They accomplish their goals through the pursuit of both basic and applied scientific research, as well as through educational programs, which serve audiences ranging in age from elementary school children to adults in continuing education programs.
General
  
World Water Monitoring Day (WWMD) is an international outreach program that builds public awareness and involvement in protecting water resources around the world. Held annually between September 18 and October 18, the program engages communities in monitoring the condition of local rivers, streams, estuaries and other water bodies. Since its inception in 2002, more than 80,000 people have participated in 50 countries.
General
  
This EPA site is a good place to start if you want to begin a volunteer water monitoring program.  The site provides methods, a national newsletter, a listserv, conferences and related links.
Izaak Walton League of America
  
Save Our Streams (SOS) is a national watershed education and outreach program. Citizen involvement in watershed protection and conservation activities has proven to have measurable, positive results on the quality of our nation’s waters. Today, more than ever, citizen involvement is critical to the protection and restoration of America’s waters. Recognizing the importance of the work you do, we provide tools and resources to help you conserve local waterways.
Izaak Walton League of America
  
This web page provides basic background information concerning biological stream monitoring—why, how, link to publications.
Izaak Walton League of America
  
Izaak Walton League of America
  
Sheet to record physical and biological monitoring data.
Kentucky Water Watch
  
Kentucky Water Watch
  
Kentucky Water Watch
  
Kentucky Water Watch
  
The Kentucky Water Watch program is run by the Division of Water in support of all volunteer monitoring efforts statewide.  The Water Watch program is dedicated to helping you protect Kentucky’s streams, rivers, lakes and wetlands. The Water Watch program accomplishes its goals through volunteer monitoring, community education initiatives and community leadership and action.
  
  
GeneralKentucky Association for Environmental Education.
Established in 1976, the Kentucky Association for Environmental Education (KAEE) is one of the country’s oldest associations supporting environmental education.  KAEE’s mission is to build a sustainable environment through education.  KAEE members include K-12 teachers, nonformal educators, government and agency personnel, university instructors, and private citizens.  KAEE offers an annual conference in September and workshops throughout the year for professional development.
GeneralBluegrass Rain Garden Alliance.
A group supporting the need for rain gardens and other stormwater management tools.
GeneralEnvironmental Education in Kentucky.
This website allows you to locate organizations and events across the Commonwealth. “EEinkentucky” is a one stop resource for teachers and all citizens who want a simple and straightforward way to discover environmental education opportunities in the Commonwealth.
GeneralBluegrass PRIDE.
Bluegrass PRIDE (Personal Responsibility In a Desirable Environment) provides environmental resources and information to schools, community groups, local governments and citizens in Central Kentucky.
GeneralKentucky EXCEL (KY Excellence in Environmental Leadership).
The Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection (DEP) is pleased to introduce its voluntary environmental leadership program, Kentucky Excellence in Environmental Leadership, known as KY EXCEL. KY EXCEL offers a nonregulatory approach that allows the department to work cooperatively with all of Kentucky’s citizens to recognize and reward the many voluntary efforts conducted each year.   KY EXCEL’s objectives are simple. The program wishes to encourage individuals, organizations and businesses to complete voluntary projects that improve Kentucky’s environment. In addition, KY EXCEL desires to facilitate a process that allows participants to increase their environmental commitment, thus reducing their environmental footprint.
GeneralKentucky Green Team Online Film Festival.
An initiative designed to highlight sustainable environmental practices. First Lady Jane Beshear asked Green Team members to send in their suggestions on how we can inspire, teach, and encourage others to take steps to improve our world’s environment. The winning submission, to host an online film festival in which Kentuckians could submit a film educating the public on energy conservation, was inspired by Syandene Evans, a freshman at Henry Clay High School in Lexington.
Kentucky Department of EducationKentucky Department of Education
Kentucky Department of Education
Kentucky Department of EducationKentucky Program of Studies and Core Content for Assessment
Kentucky Program of Studies and Core Content for Assessment
Kentucky Department of Education“How to Develop a Standards-Based Unit of Study” manual.
The 2008 manual contains a unit template, information about the components of a unit and lesson plan, sample lesson plans, and a downloadable word document template.
Kentucky Department of EducationKentucky’s Education Cooperatives.
Kentucky has a host of educational cooperatives that provide assistance and expertise for the benefit of their member school districts. This website provides the names and contact information for all of the regional offices in Kentucky. These people may be contacted to help you promote and/or offer your professional development opportunities for schools. They can also help you connect to specific teachers to work with in their classroom.
Kentucky Division of WaterKentucky Division of Water
Kentucky Division of Water
Kentucky Division of WaterKentucky Watersheds.
Basic information.
Kentucky Division of WaterKentucky River Basins Assessment Reports.
Contains interactive maps.
Kentucky Division of WaterWatershed Viewer.
Links to a clickable basin map. More detailed information is revealed by “zooming” into the map (with the “magnifying glass”) or you can click on your county to download your county map.
Kentucky Division of WaterKentucky Stormwater.
MS4 information.
Kentucky Division of WaterKY Watersheds.
Surf your watershed.
Kentucky Division of WaterKentucky Watershed Watch.
Watershed project information for volunteers.
Kentucky Division of WaterKDOW Non-Point Source Pollution.
Contains general information about non-point sources and their control.
Kentucky Educational Television (KET)Electronic Field Trip to a Watershed.
Takes students to urban and rural settings across Kentucky to see how water from rain and snow is collected and funneled into common waterways—and how human activities affect the quality of water everywhere.
Kentucky Educational Television (KET)Raindrops to Rivers.
This Professional Development Resource uses authentic video of Kentucky classrooms to showcase high quality instruction on watersheds and nonpoint source pollution. Also included are links to Kentucky Core Content and Program of Studies, lesson materials, and additional resources.
Kentucky Environmental Education CouncilKentucky Environmental Education Council.
The Kentucky Environmental Education Council was established to improve Kentuckians’ understanding of their environment. Although KEEC’s major focus is primary and secondary education, the Council also works with colleges and universities, businesses, local governments, private organizations and citizens. KEEC’s goal is to provide citizens with the knowledge they need to make their own informed decisions about their environment. Includes links to instructional resources.
Kentucky Environmental Education CouncilKentucky Green and Healthy Schools.
The Kentucky Green and Healthy Schools (KGHS) Program is a voluntary effort to empower students and staff with the tools needed to take action and make their school operate at peak efficiency by using environmentally friendly practices. The program extends into the community encouraging environmentally-friendly practices at home, work and play. Water resource protection is one area of study and action. See a list of participating schools at this website.
Kentucky Environmental Education CouncilKentucky Project WET.
Correlations to KY Core Content and more…
Kentucky Environmental Education CouncilKentucky’s Wonderful Commonwealth of Water.
  K-12 Curriculum.
Kentucky Environmental Education CouncilEnviroscape Models Available for Loan in Kentucky.
The Enviroscape is an interactive 3-D watershed model that simulates stormwater runoff and impacts from point and non-point sources.  Kentucky has several available that may be loaned for presentations.
Kentucky Geological SurveyKGS – Classroom Activities.
Kentucky maps, ways to get the word out to teachers, and more.
Kentucky Geological SurveyKGS – Resource Materials K-16
KGS – Resource Materials K-16
Kentucky Geological SurveyKentucky Land-use Planning Maps Available to Teachers
Kentucky Land-use Planning Maps Available to Teachers
Kentucky Geological SurveyHydrology of Kentucky
Hydrology of Kentucky
University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension ServiceEarth Day Resources
Earth Day Resources
University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension ServiceKentucky Water Awareness Month.
The Kentucky Water Awareness Month 2009 Packet Materials are available online. The packet includes information on stormwater, groundwater, and watersheds, and includes publications, fact sheets, promotional items, radio scripts, and activities. Please feel free to adapt and use the packet information to meet your programming needs.
University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension ServiceLiving Along a Kentucky Stream.
A practical guide for landowners with streams on or near their property. The publication provides simple Do’s and Don’ts for maintaining healthy streams and being good stream stewards.    A teaching guide and packet are also available.  This packaged program provides information about Kentucky’s streams, their importance to our state, and the actions you can take to protect this precious natural resource. Access to teaching guide, stream component quiz and answer key, stream stewardship discussion, crossword puzzle and answer key, and program evaluation.
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
200 Mero StreetFrankfortKY40622KY8:00am-4:30pm EST, M-F(502) 564-7250kytc.stormwater@ky.govhttp://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&q=200+mero+street+frankfort+ky&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=200+Mero+St,+Frankfort,+Franklin,+Kentucky+40601&gl=us&sqi=2&z=16&iwloc=A
  
  
EPA
  
EPA
  
EPA
  
EPA
  
EPA
  
EPA
  
This EPA website provides information and curricula on educating a variety of age groups on the environment and water pollution.
EPA
  
EPA
  
EPA
  
EPA
  
EPA
  
EPA Elementary Grades
  
EPA Elementary Grades
  
EPA Elementary Grades
  
EPA Elementary Grades
  
EPA High School
  
EPA High School
  
EPA High School
  
Click on a map of your state and find water resource information.
EPA Middle Grades & High School
  
EPA Middle Grades & High School
  
EPA Middle Grades & High School
  
This “free” DVD contains a Television program about watersheds that was co-produced by EPA and The Weather Channel.
General
  
Extension Service, University of Wisconsin System.  Searchable database by grade level for 150 school cur​ricula
General
  
Website for manufacturer of realistic, three-dimensional models of watersheds, landfills, wetlands and more. An effective demonstration tool for students interested in learning about point sources and non point sources of water pollution. Enviroscape Models Available for Loan in Kentucky
General
  
The packet includes information on stormwater, groundwater, and watersheds, and includes publications, fact sheets, promotional items, radio scripts, and activities. Please feel free to adapt and use the packet information to meet your programming needs.
General
  
K-12 resources from Waste Management and powered by Discovery Education
General
  
General
  
A variety of lessons and content information for K-12 teachers.
General
  
Lessons and activities to facilitate rain garden education. Whether you are building a rain garden at your school or simply incorporating rain gardens into your current curriculum, these activities can act as helpful resources. Each activity is aligned to Kentucky core content 4.1 and can be adapted to grades K-12.  The Bluegrass Rain Garden Alliance offers a $500 grant to help a school in Central Kentucky build their own demonstration rain garden! Elligible counties include Franklin, Scott, Harrison, Nicholas, Bourbon, Clark, Montgomery, Fayette, Clark,Powell, Estill, Madison, Jessamine, Garrard, Lincoln, Boyle, Mercer, Woodford, and Anderson.
General
  
General
  
A sample collection of educational stormwater surveys.
General
  
Check out this web page to download WEF’s materials and curricula for educating various age groups.  Also provides information in Spanish.
General
  
The U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Water Science for Schools web site offering information on many aspects of water, along with pictures, data, maps, and an interactive center where you can give opinions and test your water knowledge.
General
  
The Water Sourcebooks contain 324 activities for grades K-12 divided into four sections: K-2, 3-5, 5-8, and 9-12. Each section is divided into five chapters: Introduction to Water, Drinking Water and Wastewater Treatment, Surface Water Resources, Ground Water Resources, and Wetlands and Coastal Waters.  This environmental education program explains the water management cycle using a balanced approach showing how it affects all aspects of the environment.All activities contain hands-on investigations, fact sheets, reference materials, and a glossary of terms. Activities are organized by objectives, materials needed, background information, advance preparation, procedures, and resources. All parts of the program may be printed and copied.
Green Teacher
  
Green Teacher is a magazine that helps youth educators enhance environmental and global education inside and outside of schools.
Green Teacher
  
Green Teacher
  
Lamotte Lesson Plans (Water Quality)
  
These Lesson Plans are provided to help organize an existing curriculum, allowing the teacher to spend more time on hands-on activities that meet key classroom learning objectives and improve student achievement.
Lamotte Lesson Plans (Water Quality)
  
  The following lesson plans were developed by educators for use with LaMotte products.
Macro Mania
  
Macro Mania
  
Macro Mania
  
Mammoth Cave National Park
  
Mammoth Cave National Park
  
This website provides curriculum materials for grades K-12.
National Curriculum
  
National Curriculum
  
National Curriculum
  
Nonpoint Source Pollution Prevention
  
Nonpoint Source Pollution Prevention
  
Nonpoint Source Pollution Prevention
  
Nonpoint Source Pollution Prevention
  

 ‭(Hidden)‬ Content Editor

Follow Us