Continuous Flow Intersection
​The CFI is a relatively new intersection design that has been implemented in a few states at locations with high traffic volumes, including high left-turn volumes. This design removes left turning vehicles from the main intersection which then allows higher green time for the main line. Delays can be reduced significantly compared to a conventional, signalized intersection. It is also significantly less expensive than a full interchange. It can be designed with two or four advanced left turn lanes - depending on the volumes. Due to the number of segments to cross, there are issues with creating pedestrian-friendly facilities within a CFI.
 
References
Utah DOT
UDOT implemented Utah's first CFI (Continuous flow intersection) at 3500 South and Bangerter Highway. The new intersection improved traffic flow through the area with the use of an innovative new approach to intersection design. Compared to a traditional intersection, it reduces the steps in the light cycle and places left turns along a safer path.
Utah DOT

Missouri DOT
Continuous Flow Intersections are a new style of intersection, developed in Mexico. In the US, CFIs have been implemented in Louisiana, Maryland and New York, while one is currently being constructed in Utah. The first CFI in Missouri was constructed in South St. Louis county, at the intersection of Route 30 and Summit Drive.
Missouri DOT

Video Simulation
View a video demonstration of how continuous flow intersections work.
Video Simulation

Maryland Intersection Design
Left-turning vehicles begin their turn several hundred feet prior to the main intersection at a signalized "crossover" intersection and move into separated lanes to the right of the opposing thru movement. The protected left turns are completed simultaneously with thru movements, allowing simple two-phase intersection signal control.
Maryland Intersection Design