Buckle Up

 CIOT_KY.jpg
 
 
 
For anyone who complains about getting a ticket for not buckling up when driving or riding in a motor vehicle, here’s a crash course in reality:
 
  • In 2014, 672 people were killed on Kentucky’s roadways. 
  • Of those 672 killed, 521 were motor vehicle fatalities.
  • Of those 521 motor vehicle fatalities, 319 (61 percent) were not wearing a seat belt.
  • Fifteen children age 15 and under were killed in motor vehicles on Kentucky roadways.  Four (27 percent) of those were unrestrained.
  
The good news is Kentucky’s seat belt usage rate increased with the passage of the primary law from 67.2 percent in 2006 to 86.1 percent in 2014.  However, that is still below the national usage rate of 87 percent.  
 
Seat belts save lives, but must be used to do so. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), when worn correctly, seat belts are proven to reduce the risk of fatal injury to front-seat occupants by 45 percent and by 60 percent in pickup trucks, SUVs and minivans.
 
Also according to NHTSA, booster seats lower the risk of injury to children by 60 percent compared to the use of seat belts alone.
 

 Content Editor ‭[4]‬

 
Kentucky seat belt information
 
Kentucky’s seat belt usage rate increased with the passage of the primary law from 67.2 percent in 2006 to 86.1 percent in 2014.  However, that is still below the national usage rate of 87 percent.  
 
Even with the passage of our primary seat belt law, Kentucky undoubtedly experiences far too many deaths which could be avoided with the simple use of a seatbelt.
 
There were 672 total highway fatalities in Kentucky in 2014, with 521 killed in motor vehicles.  Of those 521 fatalities, 61 percent (319) were not wearing a seat belt.
 
Clearly this is an indication that people are not taking the law seriously, or they’re just not aware of the huge risk being taken by not buckling up.
 
Drivers are responsible for making sure everyone in the vehicle is buckled up.  Drivers will be fined for each person that is not wearing a seat belt.
 

 Content Editor ‭[5]‬

 
Kentucky booster seat information
 
Kentucky’s booster seat law was enhanced in 2015 to increase the height requirement to 57 inches and the age requirement to 8 years old. Children younger than 8 but taller than 57 inches will not have to ride in a booster seat.
 
When used correctly, a belt-positioning booster seat prevents injuries in a crash. A booster seat raises your child up so that the vehicle's lap and shoulder belt is properly positioned across your child's hips and chest and away from his belly and neck.
 
According to NHTSA, booster seats lower the risk of injury to children by 60 percent compared to the use of seat belts alone.
KOHS.png