School Curriculum and Teacher Resources
  
  
Partnering with Schools. Many Adopt-A-Stream programs partner with schools to develop interdisciplinary classroom curricula and activities. Through the program, teachers and students adopt a waterway, perform chemical, physical, and biological testing to determine water quality, and perform habitat restoration. Participating in such an interdisciplinary program gives classroom learning a real-life application, enhances students’ problem-solving capabilities, and provides community recognition of the students’ efforts. Teachers can select projects and activities that best match their students’ capabilities and the materials and resources available. The national Adopt-A-Stream organization , as well as numerous agencies nationwide, can provide teacher’s guides for developing a classroom Adopt-A-Stream program.  Some schools find it valuable to enlist a co-sponsor, such as a community group or private organization, to aid them in their efforts. Co-sponsors vary in their involvement with the students. Some activities that co-sponsors can undertake include meeting with students to demonstrate community support for their efforts, helping to select an appropriate waterway, providing special information about the waterway, accompanying students on field trips, helping to prepare news releases and articles about the program, providing funds (if necessary), and helping to prepare a written report that compiles all of the data from schools in the watershed. Students and community members can then use this report as a focal point around which to plan strategies for involvement and actions for the coming year.
  
EPA is building a voluntary, national catalog of organizations involved in protecting local water bodies, including formal watershed alliances, local groups, and schools that conduct activities such as volunteer monitoring, cleanups, and restoration projects.  You can search the EPA database by state and then by city to find local groups.
  
  
  
National Environmental Education Week, made possible by Canon, promotes environmental literacy and stewardship among over 3.5 million students annually by creating a full week of environmentally-themed lessons and activities for students in K-12th grade classrooms, home schools, nature centers, zoos, museums and aquariums.  Each year, thousands of educators from across the country use EE Week’s online resources to incorporate environmental learning into their classrooms in an educational week-long prelude to Earth Day. Registration for EE Week is free.
  
NAAEE is the national professional association for environmental education. NAAEE members promote professional excellence in nonformal organizations, K-12 classrooms, universities (both instructors and students), government agencies, and corporate settings throughout North America and in over 55 other countries. Since 1971, the Association has created opportunities for its members to improve their skills in creating and delivering programs and services that teach people how to think, not what to think.
  
World Water Monitoring Day (WWMD) is an international outreach program that builds public awareness and involvement in protecting water resources around the world. Held annually between September 18 and October 18, the program engages communities in monitoring the condition of local rivers, streams, estuaries and other water bodies. Since its inception in 2002, more than 80,000 people have participated in 50 countries.
  
Partnering with Schools. Many Adopt-A-Stream programs partner with schools to develop interdisciplinary classroom curricula and activities. Through the program, teachers and students adopt a waterway, perform chemical, physical, and biological testing to determine water quality, and perform habitat restoration. Participating in such an interdisciplinary program gives classroom learning a real-life application, enhances students’ problem-solving capabilities, and provides community recognition of the students’ efforts. Teachers can select projects and activities that best match their students’ capabilities and the materials and resources available. The national Adopt-A-Stream organization , as well as numerous agencies nationwide, can provide teacher’s guides for developing a classroom Adopt-A-Stream program.  Some schools find it valuable to enlist a co-sponsor, such as a community group or private organization, to aid them in their efforts. Co-sponsors vary in their involvement with the students. Some activities that co-sponsors can undertake include meeting with students to demonstrate community support for their efforts, helping to select an appropriate waterway, providing special information about the waterway, accompanying students on field trips, helping to prepare news releases and articles about the program, providing funds (if necessary), and helping to prepare a written report that compiles all of the data from schools in the watershed. Students and community members can then use this report as a focal point around which to plan strategies for involvement and actions for the coming year.
  
EPA is building a voluntary, national catalog of organizations involved in protecting local water bodies, including formal watershed alliances, local groups, and schools that conduct activities such as volunteer monitoring, cleanups, and restoration projects.  You can search the EPA database by state and then by city to find local groups.
  
  
  
World Water Monitoring Day (WWMD) is an international outreach program that builds public awareness and involvement in protecting water resources around the world. Held annually between September 18 and October 18, the program engages communities in monitoring the condition of local rivers, streams, estuaries and other water bodies. Since its inception in 2002, more than 80,000 people have participated in 50 countries
General
  
Partnering with Schools. Many Adopt-A-Stream programs partner with schools to develop interdisciplinary classroom curricula and activities. Through the program, teachers and students adopt a waterway, perform chemical, physical, and biological testing to determine water quality, and perform habitat restoration. Participating in such an interdisciplinary program gives classroom learning a real-life application, enhances students’ problem-solving capabilities, and provides community recognition of the students’ efforts. Teachers can select projects and activities that best match their students’ capabilities and the materials and resources available. The national Adopt-A-Stream organization , as well as numerous agencies nationwide, can provide teacher’s guides for developing a classroom Adopt-A-Stream program.  Some schools find it valuable to enlist a co-sponsor, such as a community group or private organization, to aid them in their efforts. Co-sponsors vary in their involvement with the students. Some activities that co-sponsors can undertake include meeting with students to demonstrate community support for their efforts, helping to select an appropriate waterway, providing special information about the waterway, accompanying students on field trips, helping to prepare news releases and articles about the program, providing funds (if necessary), and helping to prepare a written report that compiles all of the data from schools in the watershed. Students and community members can then use this report as a focal point around which to plan strategies for involvement and actions for the coming year.
General
  
EPA is building a voluntary, national catalog of organizations involved in protecting local water bodies, including formal watershed alliances, local groups, and schools that conduct activities such as volunteer monitoring, cleanups, and restoration projects.  You can search the EPA database by state and then by city to find local groups.
General
  
An 11×17-inch key to help identify river critters.
General
  
Through rigorous research, education and public outreach, the Stroud Water Research Center, seeks to advance our global knowledge and stewardship of fresh water ecosystems. Driven by the philosophy that understanding the science of fresh water is fundamental to our ability to protect the integrity of this finite and vital resource, Stroud seeks to disseminate its research findings to its peers in the scientific and educational communities, as well as businesses, landowners, policy makers and individuals, to enable informed decision making that effects water quality and availability in our local communities and the world around us.  They accomplish their goals through the pursuit of both basic and applied scientific research, as well as through educational programs, which serve audiences ranging in age from elementary school children to adults in continuing education programs.
General
  
This EPA site is a good place to start if you want to begin a volunteer water monitoring program.  The site provides methods, a national newsletter, a listserv, conferences and related links.
General
  
A detailed, illustrated guide to critters commonly found in many waterways. Written for young readers. Describes insects included in river key (see Key to Macroinvertebrate Life in the River) above.
General
  
World Water Monitoring Day (WWMD) is an international outreach program that builds public awareness and involvement in protecting water resources around the world. Held annually between September 18 and October 18, the program engages communities in monitoring the condition of local rivers, streams, estuaries and other water bodies. Since its inception in 2002, more than 80,000 people have participated in 50 countries.
Izaak Walton League of America
  
Save Our Streams (SOS) is a national watershed education and outreach program. Citizen involvement in watershed protection and conservation activities has proven to have measurable, positive results on the quality of our nation’s waters. Today, more than ever, citizen involvement is critical to the protection and restoration of America’s waters. Recognizing the importance of the work you do, we provide tools and resources to help you conserve local waterways.
Izaak Walton League of America
  
This web page provides basic background information concerning biological stream monitoring—why, how, link to publications.
Izaak Walton League of America
  
Izaak Walton League of America
  
Sheet to record physical and biological monitoring data.
Kentucky Water Watch
  
The Kentucky Water Watch program is run by the Division of Water in support of all volunteer monitoring efforts statewide.  The Water Watch program is dedicated to helping you protect Kentucky’s streams, rivers, lakes and wetlands. The Water Watch program accomplishes its goals through volunteer monitoring, community education initiatives and community leadership and action.
Kentucky Water Watch
  
Kentucky Water Watch
  
Kentucky Water Watch